Friday, April 01, 2016

Anderson Cooper 360 on Friday, April 1, 2016


Anderson Cooper again anchored AC360 from CNN's Washington, DC Bureau.  Paul Begala was on the panel tonight and we love us some Paul Begala, plus John King calling out Kayleigh McEnany telling her she was wrong!  Enjoy both parts:

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The hour closed with a segment on Democrat candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders - with NO panel discussion:

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Anderson stated prior to the first panel discussion that the panel would be discussing the comments President Obama made today when asked about Trump's recent comments on nuclear weapons.  Apparently that discussion was cut for time, but here is a video of what President Obama had to say:

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People.com released another video clip of their interview with Anderson and Gloria - this one on why they wrote The Rainbow Comes and Goes:

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And CBS Sunday Morning tweeted a link to an excerpt from their book.
Excerpt: "The Rainbow Comes and Goes"

Gloria Vanderbilt (whose sensationalized childhood, and her careers as an actress, artist and jeans designer riveted the world's attention), and her son, 48-year-old CNN anchor and "60 Minutes" correspondent Anderson Cooper, shared much throughout the course of their lives, but realized there were many things that neither of them actually knew about the other.

Their e-mail correspondence -- conversations between a mother and son about topics they had rarely broached with each other -- are now the basis of a new book, "The Rainbow Comes and Goes: A Mother and Son on Life, Love, and Loss" (HarperCollins), as well as a new HBO documentary, "Nothing Left Unsaid."

Read an excerpt from their memoir below.

Introduction

My mother comes from a vanished world, a place and a time that no longer exist. I have always thought of her as a visitor stranded here; an emissary from a distant star that burned out long ago.

When I was younger I used to try to hide that fact, not because I was ashamed of her -- far from it -- but because I wanted people to get to know me before they learned that I was her son.

Vanderbilt is a big name to carry, and I've always been glad I didn't have to. I like being a Cooper. It's less cumbersome, less likely to produce an awkward pause in the conversation when I'm introduced. Let's face it, the name Vanderbilt has history, baggage. Even if you don't know the details of my mom's extraordinary story, her name comes with a whole set of expectations and assumptions about what she must be like. The reality of her life, however, is not what you'd imagine.

My mom has been famous for longer than just about anyone else alive today. Her birth made headlines, and for better or worse, she's been in the public eye ever since. Her successes and failures have played out on a very brightly lit stage, and she has lived many different lives; she has been an actress, an artist, a designer, and a writer; she's made fortunes, lost them, and made them back again. She has survived abuse, the loss of her parents, the death of a spouse, the suicide of a son, and countless other traumas and betrayals that might have defeated someone without her relentless determination.

Though she is a survivor, she has none of the toughness that word usually carries with it. She is the strongest person I know, but tough, she is not. She has never allowed herself to develop a protective layer of thick skin. She's chosen to remain vulnerable, open to new experiences and possibilities, and because of that, she is the most youthful person I know. My mom is now ninety-two, but she has never looked her age and she has rarely felt it, either. People often say about someone that age, "She's as sharp as ever," but my mom is actually sharper than ever. She sees her past in perspective. The little things that once seemed important to her no longer are. She has clarity about her life that I am only beginning to have about mine.

At the beginning of 2015, several weeks before her ninety-first birthday, my mother developed a respiratory infection she couldn't get rid of, and she became seriously ill for the first time in her life. She didn't tell me how bad she felt, but as I was boarding a plane to cover a story overseas, I called her to let her know I was leaving, waiting until the last minute as usual because I never want her to worry. When she picked up the phone, immediately I knew something was wrong. Her breath was short, and she could barely speak.

I wish I could tell you I canceled my trip and rushed to her side, but I didn't. I'm not sure if the idea she could be very ill even occurred to me; or perhaps it did, acting on it would have been just too inconvenient and I didn't want to think about it. I was heading off on an assignment, and my team was already in the air. It was too late to back out.

Shortly after I left, she was rushed to the hospital, though I didn't find this out until I had returned, and by then she was already back home.

For months afterward she was plagued with asthma and a continued respiratory infection. At times she was unsteady on her feet. The loss of agility was difficult for her, and there were many days when she didn't get out of bed. Several of her close friends had recently died, and she was feeling her age for the first time.

"I'd like to have several more years left," she told me. "There are still things I'd like to create, and I'm very curious to see how it all turns out. What's going to happen next?"

As her ninety-first birthday neared, I began to think about our relationship: the way it was when I was a child and how it was now. I started to wonder if we were as close as we could be.

The deaths of my father and brother had left us alone with each other, and we navigated the losses as best we could, each in our own way. My father died in 1978, when I was ten; and my brother, Carter, killed himself in 1988, when I was twenty-one, so my mom is the last person left from my immediate family, the last person alive who was close to me when I was a child.

We have never had what would be described as a conventional relationship. My mom wasn't the kind of parent you would go to for practical advice about school or work. What she does know about are hard-earned truths, the kind of things you discover only by living an epic life filled with love and loss, tragedies and triumphs, big dreams and deep heartaches.

When I was growing up, though, my mom rarely talked about her life. Her past was always something of a mystery. Her parents and grandparents died before I was born, and I knew little about the tumultuous events of her childhood, or of the years before she met my father, the events that shaped the person she had become. Even as an adult, I found there was still much I didn't know about her -- experiences she'd had, lessons she'd learned that she hadn't passed on. In many cases, it was because I hadn't asked. There was also much she didn't know about me. When we're young we all waste so much time being reserved or embarrassed with our parents, resenting them or wishing they and we were entirely different people.


This changes when we become adults, but we don't often explore new ways of talking and conversing, and we put off discussing complex issues or raising difficult questions. We think we'll do it one day, in the future, but life gets in the way, and then it's too late.

I didn't want there to be anything left unsaid between my mother and me, so on her ninety-first birthday I decided to start a new kind of conversation with her, a conversation about her life. Not the mundane details, but the things that really matter, her experiences that I didn't know about or fully understand.

We started the conversation through e-mail and continued it for most of the following year. My mom had only started to use e-mail recently. At first her notes were one or two lines long, but as she became more comfortable typing, she began sending me very detailed ones. As you will see in the pages ahead, her memories are remarkably intimate and deeply personal, revealing things to me she never said face- to-face.

The first e-mail she sent me was on the morning of her birthday.

91 years ago on this day, I was born.

I recall a note from my Aunt Gertrude, received on a birthday long ago.

"Just think, today you are 17 whole years old!" she wrote.

Well, today -- I am 91 whole years old -- a hell of a lot wiser, but somewhere still 17.

What is the answer? What is the secret? Is there one?

That e-mail and its three questions started the conversation that ended up changing our relationship, bringing us closer than either of us had ever thought possible.

It's the kind of conversation I think many parents and their grown children would like to have, and it has made this past year the most valuable of my life. By breaking down the walls of silence that existed between us, I have come to understand my mom and myself in ways I never imagined.

I know now that it's never too late to change the relationship you have with someone important in your life: a parent, a child, a lover, a friend. All it takes is a willingness to be honest and to shed your old skin, to let go of the long-standing assumptions and slights you still cling to.

I hope what follows will encourage you to think about your own relationships and perhaps help you start a new kind of conversation with someone you love.

After all, if not now, when?

Excerpt from "The Rainbow Comes and Goes: A Mother and Son on Life, Love, and Loss." Copyright © 2016 by Anderson Cooper. A Harper book, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.


AC360 Transcript
AC360 Podcast


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7 comments:

aries moon said...

Kayleigh McEnaney really got schooled by the 360 political panel--she rarely backs down from her Trump arguments and talking points but she was clearly outmatched by King, Borger, Begala, Gerson and AC--all of whom seemed to be done with giving Trump the benefit of the doubt for his numerous gaffes, lies and illogical statements. Yes, there is a Trump overload on 360 but I did enjoy the panel discussion because it was a strong, insightful analysis of Trump's enormous flaws as a candidate for POTUS with people who recognize how much of a threat his ignorance poses to this country and the world.

Thanks for the excerpt from The Rainbow Comes And Goes--AC is a really fine writer--he knows his mother very well now but apparently it took some time to get to that point--it's so odd how difficult it can be to simply open up and talk honestly with the people who you are the closest to but sadly that's how it works out sometimes.

Jaanza said...

I didn't watch 360 because 'The Amazing Race' was back so I watched the ATA videos. Only five on the panel? Maybe because it's Friday? The discussion in the first vidoe was all about Trump and his myriad of positions on abortion. I'm liking Gloria Borger more than in the past; she's right-leaning but no fan of Trump and makes good statements on what's wrong with him.

Borger, John King, Michael Gerson and Paul Begala were all making logical statements about Trump. Kaleigh McEnany wsa actually fascinating in her attempts to spin everything into 'Rah Rah Trump'. She saw Trump's changing positions on abortion as being "the same answer" and though it was "a small blunder" to waffle on punishment for women who have abortions, Trump's position has been "logical and consistent". McEnany also didn't get Michael Gerson's point about Trump's electability and lack of reasoning. McEnany seemed unable to say anything positive about Trump without also dissing Cruz for encouraging states to "rebel" against the SCOTUS gay marriage ruling
Loved Begala's comment on "...Trump's incontinance, he needs some Trump adult diapers for his mouth"
Kudos for Anderson for correcting McEnany when she said Trump said "abortion is murder", nope, that didn't happen. Although Borger jumped in first to point it out, Anderson backed her up. McEnany changed tactics and said "He didn't say it because the media is foaming at the mouth waiting for him to say something wrong..." Trump has already said plenty wrong and wouldn't saying "aboriton is murder" shore up the conservative GOP base?

The second panel concentrted on a possible Trump third-party run. It started with more on the abortion issue and that lasted almost six minutes. After another clip, this one from Trump's interview with Chris Wallace and I didn't like Anderson's analysis that Wallace planted the idea of a third-party run into Trump's head. Trump's been hinting/threatening a third-party run for a long time. McEnany said it was "ping-pong baiting" Borger didn't see it that way and Anderson appeared to agree, 'this is asking questions'.

Although there wasn't any panel discussion after Jeff Zeleny's report on Clinton and Sanders, I'm glad there was some coverage of the Democratic candidates but wish it wasn't tacked on last in the show.

Thanks for posting these videos, ATA!

Anonymous said...

HUFFPOST IS REPORTING THAT HILLARY DESCRIBED TRUMP AS "AN ID WITH HAIR." NOW WELL ROUNDED, WELL READ PEOPLE, WOULD KNOW WHAT 'ID' MEANS, BUT WE NOW KNOW THAT'S NOT DONALD TRUMP. HE LACKS BOTH INTELLECT AND EDUCATION....SOMETHING LIKE, TONY SOPRANO, REAL ESTATE DEVELOPER SEEKS
WHITE HOUSE PRESIDENCY.
TRUMP'S REPLY TO HER WAS, "YA, WHAT'S THAT ABOUT?"
LIKED ANDERSON'S INTRODUCTION TO 'RAINBOWS COME AND GO.' VERY SURPRISED THAT HE WOULDN'T BE MORE PREPARED FOR HIS MOTHER'S AILMENTS. HE'S VERY LUCKY SHE HAS BEEN HEALTHY ALL THIS TIME. REALITY CHECK ANDERSON: SHE'S 92...AND IT IS NEVER EASY TO LOSE A PARENT NO MATTER WHAT AGE.


CWM84 said...

AC says its just him and his mom but his mother has other sons. AC does have other brothers. Just a weird thing to day unless they aren't close to her other children. The primary coverage is just too excessive for me. What about the anti glbt law signed but the jackass in North Carolina? The anti gay bill in Mississippi and other parts of the country. It seems this program has one topic everyday for past 8 months. Trump and this Primary election! I just can't take it. I like a variety of stories and 360 is just obsessed, in fact all of CNN is obsessed with Trump and gop primary process. Everyday its same old thing. Introduction about Trump's day... then countless pundits spin, analyze, argue, slam...etc his statements. Every single damn night. Every show on CNN is Trump this and that... what is up with CNN?

Anonymous said...

Its weird to see Gloria at her age trying to look like she is still 50 or 60. Or maybe simply amazing that she doesn't have a speck of gray hair!

Gloria has two other sons (though I guess she doesn't talk to one) and Anderson never eludes to them in any way. Wonder how that makes them and Gloria's grandchildren feel.

Anonymous said...

CNN is all about ratings now and The Donald gets rating points. Jeff Zucker said they cover The Donald because he is easily accessible, but so would the other candidates be if given the chance, Rachel Maddow has had Bernie and Hillary on quite a bit, but CNN doesn't even try any more. I don't know the last time I watched 360 for the full hour and even Berman is getting annoying - he is rude to people on.Twitter and SM saying the people want Trump all the time. Sorry but this former viewer has better things to do with their time than listen to hwsnbn bluster and pontificate for an hour.

Anonymous said...

AN SNL PARODY OF DUMB BLONDE TRUMP SUPPORTERS IS VERY ON POINT WITH A CLIP OF THEIR COLD OPEN FROM
LAST NIGHT'S SHOW. ON POINT AND ENTERTAINING, ESPECIALLY MOCKING IS THE HAND GESTURES OF THE TRUMP
SUPPORTER, DEFENDING HER VERBAL NONSENSE IN RESPONSE TO AN INTERVIEW.